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at film from august of 1963 as demonstration and marchers gathered on the mall here in washington d.c. this was the headline from the washington post, a mammoth rally of 200,000 jamming the mall in a solemn orderly plea for equality. that's our line for those of you over the age of 50. for those of you under the age of 50. 585-3880. 202 is the area code here in washington d.c. we'll get your call on march. >> your calls and comments in a moment. lots get to the other stories this morning that is latest development from syria and headlines from overseas. the guardian newspaper the attack on syria just days away as the house of commons recalled for a vote and the picture of the british prime minster as he departs yesterday as the parliament resuming session tomorrow breaking from their august recess. from the marine herald, -- miami herald, a stage is set. u.s. and allies act as syria's intelligence mount. as u.s. officials said privately that a flood of previously undisclosed intelligence including satellite images and intercepted communication erased last minute administration doubt
company" -- 50 years after the historic march on washington, we go back to the scene with john lewis, who spoke that day half a century ago. where you're standing now, looking out there. that's all the crowd. >> it was good to be in the presence of lincoln. and i feel honored to have an opportunity to come here almost 50 years later. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and
warner has the latest on options for action in syria. then we return to the march on washington 50 years on. tonight reflections from the last living speaker, georgia congressman john liu business. >> it was all inclusive it was black and white, latino, asia asian-american and native american. >> they came from idaho, wyoming, and they were there. carrying their signs. >> and we conclude our series on governing in a time of gridlock with a look at how the entertainment world sees the nation's capital. >> the question we ask is if someone is actually getting something done, do the ends justify the means? it is an interesting question to ask when washington is paralyzed by gridlock. >> that is all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by... moving our economy for 160 years, bnsf the engine that connects us. >> and the hewlett foundation working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and this program was made possible by the corporation for pub
after dr. king delivered his i have a dream speech, washington and the world will reflect on the work still to be done. meantime, the u.s. and the world allies let syria know that chemical attacks will not be tolerated. we'll get the latest on what kind of military strike could punish assad without somehow swaying the country's civil war. those realities weigh heavily on president obama today when he marks the dream anniversary, honoring the legacy of nonviolence on the eve of an expected u.s.-led military strike. good morning from washington. it's wednesday, august 28th, 2013. this "the daily rundown," i'm chuck todd. let's get right to the first reads of the morning. today is the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. of course dr. martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech before a crowd of a quarter million people in washington and millions more on television watched on that 1963 day. his remarks galvanized the civil rights movement. president obama called it one of the five greatest speeches in american history. >> when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet
georgia. recently, he and i returned to the national mall in washington to remember that day in 1963 and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got arrested together in selma, alabama. >> have you ever heard this story before? >> yes, i have. >> you have? >> i watched it on tv. >> you did? >> so you know about the sit-ins? the freedom ride? >> yeah. >> people marching for the right to vote? you know, i was on the march from selma to montgomery. i was beaten. on march 7th, 1965, a group of us, about
it in 50 years. the 1963 march on washington. >> now back to roger mudd. >> here at the lincoln memorial, the sight that is almost something no washingtonian has beheld. >> news reports from the march along with coverage of the civil rights movement helped change minds about the protesters and the fight to end segregation. we'll talk with the reporters who were there, including dan rather, who reported for cbs news and paul delaney, a founding member of the national association of black journalists. >>> plus "the new york times" says espn dropped its partnership with public tv's "front line" when the nfl objected to a documentary about head injuries. does this show the influence sports leagues have over sports journali journalism's biggest player? >>> and are you one of the movie goers that made this the top-grossing film last weekend? >> there he is. what's your name sdm. >> cecil gaines. >> i'm carter wilson, head butler. >> did you know the story of "the butler" began with one reporter's quest for the ultimate white house insider? we'll talk with the "washington post"'s wil haygood ab
approaches this situation is a top priority. "the washington post" published something online that u.s.,s details about the that the budget has grown enormously since 9/11, that the cia is far bigger than outside experts had estimated, that the u.s. is involved in new cyber programs to attack other programs in countries. this information has never been released despite efforts from outside folks. does the president believe this is helpful now and the current climate to have discussion about the details about how the u.s. is spending its money in these departments to get a better understanding, as he said, make the public comfortable with how this money is being spayed and what type of programs are being used? -- that storyhed was published since i walked out here. i'm not in a position to comment on a specific story. the president believes that strengthening public confidence in these programs is important to the success of these programs. there is little debate about the fact these programs are critical to our national security, that they have made a role in protecting the homeland
be a lie. >> got my attention. priceless memories, firsthand witnesses to march on washington gathered in d.c. for a special celebration. we are going to take you there. >> first honoring the best of the best, '72 dolphins get their white house moment. only taken 37 years. 7:09, we'll be right back. ask me what it's like to get your best night's sleep every night. [announcer] why not talk to someone who's sleeping on the most highly recommended d in america? ask me about my tempur-pedic. ask me how fast i fall asleep. ask me about staying asleep. [announcer] tempur-pedic owners are more satisfied than owners of any traditional mattress brand. tempur-pedic. the most highly recommended bed in america. buy a tempur-pedic mattress set and get a free twin tempur-simplicity mattress. find a store near you at tempurpedic.com. ♪ turn around ♪ every now and then i get a little bit hungry ♪ ♪ and there's nothing good for me around ♪ ♪ turn around ♪ every now and then i get a little bit tired ♪ ♪ of craving something that i can't have ♪ ♪ turn around barbara ♪ i finally found t
to make the first march on washington and i never really got over that until president obama said please lead us in the invocation, and that was in january of this year. thank you reverend sharpton and others for asking me to lend a few words to this most precious gatheri gathering as i look out at the crowd, i find myself saying, what are we doing today? where have we come from? what has been accomplished and where do we go from this point forwa forward? i think of one theme that has been played over and over in the past few months and it's one that bring great controversy. stand your ground. and we can think of standing your ground in the negative, but i ask you today to flip that coin and make stand your ground a positive ring for all of us who believe in freedom and justice and equality, that we stand firm on the ground that we have already made and be sure that nothing is taken away from us because there are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom. and i ask you today will you allow that to happen? take the words "stand your ground" in a positive sense. stand your ground in terms
. seven blacks and six whites left washington, d.c. on two buses they headed south. at first, only minor hostility greeted them. but when one bus arrived in birmingham alabama, a mob surrounded them and beat the freedom fighters. >> i was on the greyhound, that was the bus they set on fire. burned it. and we would have all burned to death had it not been for the fact that one of the fuel tanks of the bus exploded, scared the hell out of the mob. >> reporter: that ride ended abruptly and the riders feared the violence would snuff out the movement. the first ride was not the last. students willing to face death picked up the cause boarding buses heading south. in his san francisco home, frank nelson shares his story with blankenhide. nelson took his first ride in june, by then the movement had spread to trains. >> they got off the train and headed to the homes that were right there. the black riders went into the whites homes and they were carted off to jail. >> reporter: nelson was 23 when his body was bruised and beaten. >> friend, i'm a mississippi segragist and i'm proud of it. >> repo
. >>> as dawn broke on washington, d.c., 50 years ago today, no one knew what to expect. dr. martin luther king, junior had been up most of the night in his room writing and rewriting the speech he was to give that day, though the most sub lime passage would never appear on that page. the earliest press reports that morning suggested that only about 25,000 people would show up. organizers of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were nervous. putting out fires, working behind the scenes to keep the collision behind the march in tact and preparing to channel the sea of humanity that they hoped to call forth. and then the buses and the trains came, and the people came with them by the thousands. and by that afternoon, more than 200,000 people, black and white spread out before the shadow of the great emancipator, disciplined and skeweding the spirit of solidarity. they listened to speakers one by one who called the nation to meet the demands that justice placed upon it, and about 2:40 in the afternoon, the last speaker rose to the lectern. some fretted the tv cameras would be gone by the t
on anniversary of the march on washington, and the legacy of martin luther king jr.. series, first ladies, influence and image. over the next couple of hours, we will visit places with history curators. away fighting the revolutionary war, martha washington ran their plantation. >> it is clear that martha arrived at mount vernon in 1859 and there was a lot of management that she had to do. when she married george washington, she brings with her to mount vernon 12 housemates. that is really almost unimaginable luxury. these are slaves that are for the most part, not field labor, not producing crops, which is where your income is coming from. they are doing things like cooking, serving at table, clean the house, doing the laundry, doing selling, this is not productive labor in the sense that it is not productive income. she brings them with her and she brings financial resources to the marriage as well as her managerial skills. it makes mount vernon a successful operation and it makes it possible for washington to be away for eight years fighting a war. the fact that he has this support sys
por espionaje... miles de estudiantes universitarios regresaran a clases en washington, pero recibiran un duro golpe en su economia.. y es que segun un informe, el costo para estacionarse en los planteles incrementara consideradamente... claudia uceda nos tiene los detalles.. daniel empieza su vida universitaria en la capital y aun no sabe si necesitara un auto. daniel aizenman/estudiante universitario " aun no tengo un plan, podria considerarlo." estos padres ya dejaron a su hijo en los dormitorios del campus de american university, ellos son conscientes que su hijo tendra que tomar decisiones. samuel aizenman/padre de daniel "me imagino que es el quien va a tener que lidiar con este costo. sabra si va a tener que tener carro, una bicicleta o nada ..." futuro que le puede costar muy caro a muchos estudiantes que llegan a la capital... ya que de acuerdo con la triple a los costos de los permisos para estacionar vehiculos en universidades han aumentado en algunos casos como un 80 porciento jeanette tejada/portavoz aaa "el estacionamiento es muy limitado y caro en washington dc..." el es
be the secretary of dhs is the most thankless job in washington. that is not true. no doubt, it is a very big and comics job. it is literally a 24/7 job, that as my successor will soon learn, it is also one of the most rewarding jobs there is. what you do hear matters to the lives of people all across our great nation him and your decisions affect them in direct and tangible ways. you make sure their families are safe from terrorist threats, that their local first responders have equipment and training and funding, and that when disaster strikes people who have lost everything are given food and shelter and hope. and that thanks for that is not owed any single individual or cabinet secretary, but to that 240,000 dhs employees, many of whom work in tough conditions around the clock to accomplish our shared and noble mission, and that includes some who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. they are the backbone of your nation's homeland security, and over the past 4 1/2 years, it has been my pleasure to serve with them and build a more agile department of homeland security. i thank
at the 1963 march on washington for jobs on freedom. "he has got the whole world in his hands. >> let us listen please to the words of this song and understand that in the heart of our creator, every soul has the same value and should be valued equally. thank you very much for the opportunity to sing for you. ♪ he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole wide world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. [singing "he's got the whole ♪orld in his hands"] ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the speaker of the united states house of representatives, the honorable john boehner. >> how about a round of applause? [applause] let me thank my colleagues for their testimonials and express my gratitude to all the members of staff of the congressional black caucus in their assistance planning this ceremony. we have many guests. the mayor is here. our attorney general is here. we want to welcome all of you. right now, i have the distinct honor of introducing a great patriot, the recipient of the presidential medal of freedom, a
. ♪ [applause] >> thank you. 50 years ago, they did not take a bus outing to come to washington. there will be those that will miscast this as some great social event. but let us remember 50 years ago some came to washington having rode the back of buses. some came to washington that couldn't stop and buy a cup of coffee until they got across the mason dixon line. some came to washington sleeping in their cars because they couldn't rent a motel room. some came to washington never having had the privilege to vote. some came having seen their friends shed blood. but they came to washington so we could come today in a different time and a different place and we owe them for what we have today. [applause] i met a man not long ago, i tell it often, he says i'm african american but i don't understand all this civil rights marching you're talking about, reverend al. i've accomplished, i've achieved. look at my resume. i went to the best schools. i'm a member of the right clubs. i had the right people read my resume. civil rights didn't write my resume. i looked at his resume. i said, y
think about the march on washington they only think about the dream speech and that part of the speech. they don't think about anything else and you are right. he said a lot harsher things than anyone talked about. this is including the absence of women on the stage on purpose. they even missed the dream part of the speech. they were looking so much for the violence that they did not see it. i'm wondering how they thought, with anyen there, notice that they've missed the story. >> i want to address media coverage on the march on washington and i remember the three major networks were there. withoutered it interruption and they broadcasted it to europe. "the washington post" assign more than 60 reporters to cover that story. it was really big news. a congressman, you said that the civil rights movement without the media would be like a bird without wings. what did you mean? >> i meant that. >> i know you did, but tell us what you meant. without the media, especially in the american south, without reporters, without the photographer, without the cameras to bring the message .nto the livi
in the 1963 march on washington remember the events of that day in a discussion hosted by the martin luther king, jr. memorial library in washington, d.c. this is an hour 30 minutes. >> when our archivist suggested that i conduct oral histories with people that attended the march, i jumped at the opportunity to hear firsthand accounts of the days that i, like many of you, had only known about in books, photos and media reflections. i was curious about literal and other journeys that people took to get to the lincoln memorial on that hot august day in 1963. we put out a call for people it into the march to be interviewed and the panelists here today were the first to answer that call. it is important to note that this is the beginning of an ongoing project and derek and our collection not only oral histories but also memorabilia and other artifacts from the march to the washingtonian the community archive. two of the panelists, peter bailey and doctor ella kelly were right under my nose as their regular attendees to the black studies lecture series that takes place in the black study center
anniversary of the march on washington. wasn't it exciting to see the enthusiasm and the film of the people of the day? who could have expected so many of us would be here who had ties to all that was owing on? who could suspect that we would all be with john lewis? [applause] attorney general, mr. mayor, you honor us with your presence. .he fierce urgency of now words rang out across the national mall, the call echoed in households across america. the summons ignited a movement to make real the promise of democracy. of course everyone knows the "i had a dream" speech, but the fierce urgency of now part of it was not only an inspiration, it was a motivation to act. was not the first time dr. martin luther king jr. urged fellow travelers to reject the status quo, to in his words at the march, refuse to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. seven years early now to trim of in francisco, my hometown, 1956, dr. king delivered the same message to the delegates of the naacp convention. --said "now i realize those all over are telling us we must slow up, he said, but we cannot afford this slo
of dictator throwing thunder bolts out of the sky in washington. he's not. this is a federal system and that means the states are involved. and that's as it should be. and i think more power to him -- or more kudos to had him for wanting to do it that way. some states are participating in the health care markets. some are not. the feds will do it if the states don't. on immigration, there's a role for the states and i think it is going to be an ecpabded role for the states in any kind of reform. on health care, the interesting thing to me is that the business -- a lot of the business community wants obama care to go through. by business community, i mean hospitals, insurers, health care networks, they want more customers. so they went to this republican red state governor and said, you know what? this is pro business. be for it. and she was. >> i think to howard's point, the notion that no good deed goes unpunished. jan brewer is expanding the medical roles which i think is a very good move. there's very little that i think jan brewer does that's good. this is a good thing. low-inco
of the march on washington. we'll take you there live. >>> and 184,000 acres burned. plus, 4,000 firefighters equals one of the worst wildfires in california state history. we're going to have a live report. this is "cnn newsroom." u.s. officials are all but telling u.n. inspectors to get out of syria, get out of the way. it is not and if, but when the u.s. will launch an attack. the u.n. teams are carrying on. inspectors back to evidence for the alleged chemical attack. these pictures were posted online showing inspectors talking to survivors at a medical facility near damascus. u.s. warships, they are ready, but there are warnings here at home and around the world that the united states could create inextricable mess by conducting a military strike on syria. cnn is the only u.s. network broadcasting live from inside of the country, inside syria. fred pleitgen is on the ground in damascus with the very latest. fred, essentially what is it like to be there with people thinking and believing that a strike is imminent? >> well, i have to tell you, people really do seem to be nervous here. there
material, in connection with the speech he gave on the march on washington, i had provided him with a summary of ideas and summary of language that he had previously discussed. so it wasn't as if i was providing him with some creative ideas that were solely mine. i was more like a secretary who was summarizing and putting in the form that could be used for the speech, the opening paragraphs, little did i know, until i was sitting listening to him, i was standing some 50 feet behind him, when i was listening very carefully, i said, oh, my god, i guess he decided to use those opening paragraphs. to those paragraphs, which constituted the first seven paragraphs. to those opening paragraphs, he seemlessly added his own additional paragraphs, and it was when he was speaking his own additional paragraphs that he was interrupted from the written speech that he had prepared. and he was interrupted by mahalia jackson who shouted to him, tell him about the dream, martin. tell him about the dream. most people don't know that the speech which is so frequently celebrated over the years, the
march on y of the washington. we will be joined by clarence lusane. ♪ashingt"washington journal" is. host: the lincoln memorial, a key part of the march 50 years ago, a key part of the event today. commemorating the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. live coverage starts at nine on c-span three, part of american history tv. we will devote part of this program to the topic of the march, as well as the civil rights act. for the first 45 minutes we are turning to politics. john boehner, in a conference call with republican lawmakers, told a group he plans to craft a short-term bill that would fund the government, avoiding a government shutdown. for our next 45 minutes, we are interested in hearing from republicans only. the acttalk about itself, the larger implications of the funding of the health- care law, but we want to get your thoughts on our phone line. here's how you can do so. it is republicans only. if you live in the eastern and central time zone, it is 202- 585-3880. if you live in the pacific or mountain time zone, it is 202- 585-3881. you can reach us on twitter
this country and to mark the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, and the good saturday afternoon to you, everyone. i am craig melvin coming live from the feet of the lincoln memorial continuing our coverage. we heard speech from civil rights and political leaders ranging from attorney general eric holder of course here and house speaker -- house minority leader nancy pelosi and the families of trayvon martin and of course martin luther king iii scheduled to join us at some point here over the next hour or so, and again right now thousands about to start retracing the steps that marchers took 50 years ago. so has peter alexander who is along the march route and let me start with you. what is the scene like right now? >> so right now we're along the route on independence avenue and you can see the police are clearing the way as they arrive here at the martin luther king memorial. we are joined by so many people who witnessed history as we wait to see those who participated in it, one of those voices is the gentleman i met today named franklin delano, no roosevelt, but williams. you
on washington? >> the purpose of it was jobs. but what was behind that and what was the revelation for me was how much and everything dr. king did was really all about education. was all about education. he was locked in on that and when that group went into the white house and talked with the president, president kennedy said and this is reported by brandt, that the kind of influence you have in the black community you really ought to emphasize schools and getting your kids to do well in schools. >> i am struck mostly by how different things are now. the technology is such a you can get a flash mob to show up if you want but 1963 you get 200,000 people back to the mall and you would be below horned. organizing was remarkable and that to me -- i would like people to understand the enormity of that. >> a very short time a group of people came together because they believe in something. and they put together the most unbelievable moment in american history. >> on the march on washington to go forward but the young people who want to be journalists tuesday that they have an obligation to cov
. this is the "full court press" coming to you live on current tv from our studio on capitol hill in washington, d.c. good to see you this morning and good to have you with us and welcome to washington and the summer in washington where it's kind of a ghost town with the congress out of town and the president out of town. he spent the night in los angeles. he will be down at camp pendleton later this afternoon. we will bring you up to date on the news of the day and take your calls at 1-866-55-press. look forward to hearing from you on twitter at bpshow and on facebook at facebook.com/billpressshow. in the news today, of course, everybody still buzzing about the fact that "the washington post" was sold. could "the new york times" be next? that's what people are asking. and around washington, the most common reaction is well, jeff bezos bought it, at least it wasn't rupert murdoch or the koch brothers. good news on the child obesity front. give some credit to first lady michelle obama. pardon me. oh, my god, i don't think i've ever done that on television before but for the first time ever -- not e
. "washington journal" is next. ♪ good morning. august 12, 20 13. attorney general eric holder is set to announce that low-level, nonviolent drug offenders will no longer be charged minimum mandatory sentence -- sentences. it is part of an overall package to reform american prisons. he will make the remarks at the american bar association today in san francisco. we want to begin there. what is your take on the attorney general's proposal to reform the prison system in this country? republicans -- democrats -- independents -- you can send us a tweet if you go to twitter.com @cspanwj. on our facebook page, facebook.com/c-span. or e-mail us. we will begin with the front page of the "washington post" -- this is what the attorney general is going to propose, that low-level, nonviolent drug offenders with no ties to gangs or large-scale drug organizations will no longer be charged with offenses that impose severe mandatory sentences. it goes on to say it goes on to say we want to get your thoughts on this. what do you think about the attorney general setting this forward? this is his goal.
goose bumps. and you can't help but become emotional. the mall in washington today is packed with people from all over the country. thousands of people who made this journey on the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. the national mall is filled. you can see the reflecting pool and the monument in the background. then over my shoulder, the lincoln memorial where we have been hearing performances all day which will culminate with the president of the united states. the first african-american president giving his speech on the anniversary. i am don lemon, everyone. we're going to hear from three presidents this afternoon. former president jimmy carter will speak. as well as former president bill clinton will speak here as well. then, of course, president barack obama. plus, civil rights icon, congress n congressman john lewis, the only surviving speaker from the 1963 march on washington will deliver his remarks. first we'll hear from superstar oprah winfrey. oprah is scheduled to speak any minute now. we wait for oprah winfrey and others to take to the podium, and they will begin t
, straight-forward news". "accurate, responsible" says the washington post. and the baltimore sun says, "instantly engaging and powerful". al jazeera america, there's more to it. make sure that stories don't escape them. >> every day a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you heard angles you hadn't considered. consider this, antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo. stories that matter to you. saudi arabia for that. ♪ test test .. . .. . but should you be made aware if you are consuming them. that's next on "consider this." welcome back to al jazeera. members of congress are being briefed right now about syria. >> possibly to start the end of this week, about now. now things look so very different. the loyal britt whose have stood by the americans in iraq, and afghanistan will not be onboard, this time. so obama has to decide, i think, whether to go it alone with perhaps the support of the french. and it looks like there's no way he is going to have a u.n. security council mandate. i think part of the parliamentary debat
is speak the truth. secondly, there is a new generation of leaders stepping forward in washington. new, young at leaders, people like rand paul and marco rubio and mike lee and kelly ayotte. [applause] you know what is incredible? five years ago, not one of them was in office. you have to go back to after world war ii to see an instance where the generation of leaders who were effectively defending free-market principles is a new generation stepping forward -- let me suggest something. if you look at that new generation, they are almost always exactly the same age. was 10 whence, i ronald reagan became president. i was 18 when ronald reagan left the white house. know how for the world war ii generation, many of them would prefer to fdr as "our president?" i will go to my grave with ronald reagan defining what it means to be present. -- president. [applause] he didn't blink. i have referred to this next generation, this new generation as the children of reagan. listen to them communicate. listen to kelly stand up and talk about free-market principles. listen to marco. listen to rent. --
anniversary of the march on washington. david martin and holly williams on the countdown to an attack on syria. scientists discover a brain protein that improves memory. dr. jon lapook has the study. a cbs news poll out tonight reveals how much america is changing on race. and memories of the march from the foot soldiers who were there. icons of civil rights on what is left to be done. >> the future is in your hands, in your heart, in your mind. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley reporting tonight from washington. ing tonight from wash >> pelley: good evening. today the president commemorated one momentous event-- the march on washington-- as he contemplated another: a possible military strike on syria. we're going to start tonight with the 50th anniversary of the march and dr. martin luther king's i have a dream speech. president obama stood as dr. king did at the lincoln memorial and addressed a crowd of thousands gathered on the national mall. he paid tribute to those who had marched a half century earlier demanding jobs and freedom. >> on the battl
canceled his meeting with russian president vladimir putin. that is all next on "washington journal." ♪ is sunday,orning, it august 11 come up 20 13. it is today, resident obama began his week long vacation at martha's vineyard. today we will be discussing the state of u.s. relations with dive intoking a deep u.s. job numbers, and talking about recent al qaeda threats. before we do that we want to hear about the state of news media from our viewers. the pew research center's -- you research center released its biannual data and while there is still plenty of criticism about the industry, most americans continue to believe the media plays an important watchdog role. as we take you through that reports this morning, we want to hear your thoughts. he of us a call. we split our lineup -- we split our lines up by age group. you can also catch up with us on all of your favorite social media sites, on twitter and facebook. you can also e-mail us at .ww.c-span.org we want to take you to that report that was released on thursday by the pew research center for the people. public valuations
's daylong march on washington, celebrating 19630th anniversary of the march on washington. welcome to "washington journal" on the sunday, august 25, 2013. we will play you a couple of more comments from yesterday's speech. the question this morning, does new technology create better jobs? we will show you the opinion piece that is prompting our question. here are a couple of ways to participate in the discussion, as usual. by phone -- make sure you mute your television or radio when you call in. you can reach us on twitter or facebook. or send journal@c-span.org us an e-mail, the e-mail address is -- or send us an e-mail, the address is journal@c-span.org. the front page this morning of t,"e washington pos the headline -- part of the reporting this morning area did president obama will be speaking on the actual anniversary day at the lincoln memorial. that is coming up on wednesday. here's the front page of the new york times and their front page photo from the march yesterday -- e froml play you mor that. comeshnology and jobs, it in an opinion peas from "the new york times," wri
jefferson, lincoln, washington had fought for. the only, i think, two pieces of oratory that would rival it would be fdr's, the only thing we have to fear is fear itself and president kennedy inaugural address. martin luther king joined the founding fathers 50 years ago today. >> reverend al sharpton obviously an important event 50 years ago. 50 years laterer there will be an african-american president going to commemorate this moment. what an extraordinary journey it has been and the journey, as you say every day and as all americans understand, the journey continues. what do you want to hear from the president of the united states today? >> well, i think that what we want to hear is a commitment to continue that journey but to also salute the fact that we have made the journey. we met with him two days ago after having a huge march on saturday about the issues now. and one of the things that i said is that i feel that he should not be compared to dr. king. he is the president. we want to hear from him as the generation before us heard from kennedy about what we are going to do. so i th
on washington. this is our coverage of the dream 50 years later. events under way, we want to take you live now to the stage in front of the lincoln memorial. that is the same spot that dr. dr. jr. made that famous "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago. you can see umbrellas are out. the crowds number in the tens of thousands if not more gathering to make history today. some 50 years later. the choirs are singing. our mike viqueira is there, oprah winfrey will be starting the ceremonies in just a second. this is the lineup speaking today will be dr. king's family. presidents barack obama, bill clinton and jimmy carter as well as silver rights leader congressman john lewis. there will an number of bands and choirs performing in front of the crowd. joining us now from the lincoln memorial our mike viqueira. we have our dr. aubrey hendri hendrix{^l" ^}, and dr. williams of history and codirector of black studies. dr. hendrix, i want to start with you because you had a front-row seat to history last night. you were dining with a few important people. who might that have been. >> well, it was a large
for the weekend. cooler pattern for the weekend. >> 74 right now in washington. 73 this new york city. a little cooler north and west. columbus is 62 and binghamton 60 degrees. we're on the warm side of things. we'll watch the temperaturese warm up to the 80s andnd eventually upper 80s near 90. 9. much like yesterday. yesterday turned to a nice day.d a little t bit of cloudiness tos start your day. it's holding back the follow fol vegment which is good newsews because yesterday we had localll very dense fog.. still a possibility before sunrise. we coll see fog develop. particularly if you are a viewer to the west bewareuld encounter thick, dense fog without much notice.ce. otherwise partly sunny today ant could be a scattered shower or thunderstorm this afternoon as we heat up the atmosphere.tmos warm and humid. 88 is the high. >> thank you tucker. time now 20 check in with julie wright and get an update on the morning commute.morn >> we're starting off quiet this morning.ing. so far without issue for folks headed around the capitol beltway. you will find your lanes are open if y
baby. good morning, washington at 5:00 a.m. beginning right now. >> live, and in h.d., this is good morning, washington. on your side. >> good morning, washington. i'm scott. >> thank you for waking up with us on this tuesday morning. we will start with your weather, head over to jackie do talk about the forecast, you rah going to need that umbrella today, jackie. >> . >> all right, we will -- we are going to get back to jackie in just a second, they are having a little bit of a technical issue, let's get on over to amanda. >> 66 eastbound, with ehave a work zone that is still lingering this morning. now, we just got word that the two left lanes are closed. we can see on this live shot that they are staying in that far right lane, and it looks hay may have just picked up those cones there. that camera beaks up every once in a while. hopefully that will get cleared soon. our mapping system shows thaws will be eastbound. the right lane was closed but the traffic center, tells us that they do have that moved over to the shoulder now. so all lanes are open, just expect some slight slow
that was water. the river came in much closer. it is now washington. as you walk that in fact was the nec as you come in from now the south bend and to boston. it was one of dozens to occupy the gigantic boston harbor and the british had the needy. they kept the entrance open so they could get provisions whether they be from england or from canada. this meant that even though they were completely surrounded by land, boston as a british occupied garrison wasn't going to start. in june of 1775 and this was a battle like none other to it like a terrified young spectator event for those not only living in boston, but in towns around all of the roots of boston were filled with people watching as more than 2,000 regulars made their way across the harbor and the charles river to the charlestown peninsula and began the assault that would erupt into the battle of bunker hill. so this was something viewed by anyone here and then there would settle into a stalemate that would then have george washington archive and that would change anything. and then eventually in march 17, 1776, the british would be forc
after the march on washington, let us remember that dr. king's last march was never finished. the poor people's campaign was never finished. some 50 years after the march on washington, while if you were -- you are people as a percentage in our country are poor, more as a number in our country are poor. while the ladder of opportunity extends to the heavens for our people today, more are tethered at the bottom and falling off everyday. say that thean distance between a child's aspirations represented by the top of that letter and a family situation at the bottom of that is the exactder measurement of that aaron's level of frustration. as we go home today, let us remember that the dreamer was also a doer. as we turn on our tvs tomorrow and see people walking out of places where they are being forced to survive on $7.25 by the thousands, let us commit to join them in fighting to lift up the bottom. at the top of that letter has extended, the tethers at the bottom must be unleashed. let us not just be dreamers. let us recommit to be doers. thank you, and god bless. [applause] >> from dest
to the u.s. and wants to work with washington and wants to work with the fbi. like the other people, we have also been told the source of the current threat goes squarely back to yemen. as for the timing, there three main reasons. is the chatter and the information about a specific threat. two, tomorrow. tomorrow is the holiest day of ramadan, the muslim holy month and al qaeda tried to use this specifically very holy day during ramadan to try and increase its inspiration. lastly, there was an attack, a drone attack in yemen mid-last month that didn't get a lot of attention in the western media. one of the top leaders of al qaeda and the arabian peninsula in yemen was killed. we have been told this plot or alert may be al qaeda and the arabian peninsula's attempt at revenge. >> thanks to both of you. more on the threat tomorrow morning on "meet the press." david gregory's guest will be chambliss and dick disturb ib in. >> unrelated to the militants with ties to pakistan, ax tack india's consilate in afghanistan. three suicide bombers armed with assault rifles and a car packed with explo
hosted by the stemson center in washington, d.c. included analysts like stuart bolin, inspector general for iraq reconstruction and his recent report arguing that a the u.s. does not have a well executed plan to implement and oversee the reconstruction efforts. defense department and u.n. officials also participated in the discussion. this is an hour and a half. >> good morning everyone. i am ellen laipson and i'm delighted to welcome you to the stimson center for this muggy of this conversation about war and peace new tools for messy transition. we are gathering at the time that we can see the end of both the iraq and afghanistan engagement, and this event in a way is pivoted around the offer by the special inspector general for the iraqi reconstruction to present some of the findings for the final report so the special inspector general office created in 2004 is now completing its work so it is a moment of reflection and looking back at what are some of the lessons of iraq, but we know that iraq is such an out liar and may be such an exception in the kind of engagement both the united
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